Severin Kitanov


Professional Details

Title Chairperson
Department Philosophy
Office Sullivan Building 203B5
Phone 978.542.6315
Email severin.kitanov@salemstate.edu
Photo of Severin Kitanov

Recent and Upcoming Courses

IDS 287 Perspectives On Evil and the Holocaust
IDS 731 Perspectives On Evil and the Holocaust
PHL 100 Introduction to Philosophy
PHL 203 Business Ethics
PHL 240N History of Western Philosophy I: Antiquity & the Middle Ages
PHL 260N History of Western Philosophy Ii: the Modern Era
PHL 303 Philosophy of Religion
PHL 313 Philosophy of Mind
PHL 350H Topics in Ethics
PHL 490 Senior Seminar
PHL 520 Internship in Philosophy

Professional Biography

Born in Varna, Bulgaria and educated at the local French Gymnasium “Frédéric Joliot-Curie,” Dr. Kitanov moved to Finland, where he received his MA and Doctorate of Theology from the University of Helsinki. In addition to serving as full-time Philosophy Department faculty at Salem State University, Dr. Kitanov has also taught philosophy classes at Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, and Gordon College, Wenham, MA.

Professional Interests

Dr. Kitanov’s specialty is Philosophy of Religion and Theological Ethics with a particular focus on medieval scholastic theology and philosophy. Dr. Kitanov is also passionate about paleography (the study of ancient and medieval handwriting), and the critical editing of Medieval Latin theological and philosophical texts.

Selected Publications

  • “The Concept of Beatific Enjoyment (Fruitio Beatifica) in the Sentences Commentaries of Some Pre-Reformation Erfurt Theologians,” in Medieval Commentaries on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, vol. 3, ed. Philipp W. Rosemann (Leiden-Boston: E.J. Brill, 2015), 315–368.
  • Beatific Enjoyment in Medieval Scholastic Debate: The Complex Legacy of Saint Augustine and Peter Lombard (Lanham-Boulder-New York-Toronto-Plymouth, UK: Lexington Books, 2014).
  • “Is it better for the king of England to be a king of England than a duke of Aquitaine? Richard FitzRalph and Adam Wodeham on whether beatific enjoyment is an act of the intellect or an act of the will,” in Richard FitzRalph: His life, times and thought, eds Michael W. Dunne and Simon Nolan O. Carm. (Dublin/Portland, OR: Four Courts Press, 2013), 56–78.
  • “Happiness in a Mechanistic Universe: Thomas Hobbes on the Nature and Attainability of Happiness,” Hobbes Studies 24:2 (2011): 117–36.
  • “The Problem of the Relationship between Philosophical and Theological Wisdom in the Scholasticism of the 13th and Early 14th-Centuries,” Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 31:1 (2011): 89–99.
  • “How to Baptize a Monster: The Culture of Debate in the Medieval University,” Sextant: The Journal of Salem State College 18:1 (2010): 2–10.
  • “Peter of Candia on Demonstrating that God is the Sole Object of Beatific Enjoyment,” Franciscan Studies 67 (2010): 427–89.
  • “1200-luvun Aristotelismi” [13th-Century Aristotelianism, in Finnish], Keskiajan filosofia [Medieval Philosophy], toim. Vesa Hirvonen & Risto Saarinen (Helsinki: Gaudeamus, Helsinki University Press, 2008), 48–65.
  • “Displeasure in Heaven, Pleasure in Hell: Four Franciscan Masters on the Relationship between Love and Pleasure, and Hatred and Displeasure,” Traditio 58 (2003): 285–340.